Proliferation and Materiality 28 - 30 May at Fort Delta

Exhibition : Beth Caird, Xanthe Waite and Grace Wood

 

Exhibition: Beth Caird, Xanthe Waite and Grace Wood

Thursday 28th – Saturday 30th May

11:00AM – 5:00PM daily

An experimentation with the idea of the proliferation of photography as self-reflective medium (that has a need to dissect itself). How can the archive be used to intersect foreign reality with personal conceptualisation?  Is there a trade off between the aesthetic forms of repetition and negation over the historical documentation of the archive? Or does one enhance the other? 

Beth Caird's video collage works layer images and footage, subtitles and soundscapes to reflect on the interiority afforded to women artists and self-identification as an artist. She intends to create a series of exchanges and interventions with artists located overseas using google documents, google hangouts, emails to explore how fiction can be employed dissociatively as a means to tell unspoken truths.

Xanthe Waite’s practice explores ideas of authorship and materiality in relation to the photograph and the archive. She is interested in (creating) interruptions and obstructions through which we encounter images. These sets of conditions aim to mine the potential inherent in the archive to activate a social function.

Grace Wood works within a photographically based spatial practice that focuses on the relationship between image and reality. Her photographs are tested through engagement with colour darkroom processes, and the way these processes translate into contemporary modes for understanding conceptual photography. 

 

Screening: Bernadette (2008) by Duncan Campbell

Saturday 30th May

2:00PM

Please join us for a free screening of artist and Turner Prize winner Duncan Campbell’s film Bernadette (2008) at Fort Delta.

Bernadette presents an unravelling, open-ended story of the female Irish dissident and political activist, Bernadette Devlin. Duncan Campbell is interested in fusing documentary and fiction in order to assess both the subject matter and the mode of communicating it. 'Documentary is a peculiar form of fiction. It has the appearance of verity grounded in many of the same formal conventions of fiction--narrative drive, linear plot, and closure. Yet, the relationship between author/subject/audience is rarely investigated in the same way as it is in meta-fiction. I want to faithfully represent Devlin, to do justice to her legacy. Yet what I am working with, are already mediated images and writings about her. What I produce can only ever be a selection of these representations, via my own obsessions and my desire to make engaging art of her. My film is an admission of limitation, but I have too much respect for Devlin for it to be an expression of nihilism or irony. I am striving for what Samuel Beckett terms, "a form that accommodates the mess". I want to broaden the scope of the film to include this space and tension, which is typically excluded or concealed, and that is the reason for the overlapping strands in the film...' Duncan Campbell

Discussion: Victoria Lynn and Elvis Richardson

Saturday 30th May 

3:00PM

Following the screening of Bernadette, SOAP are excited to be hosting a discussion with guests Victoria Lynn and Elvis Richardson. Lynn is the current director of TarraWarra Museum of Art, as well as a curator and writer. Richardson is an established artist and writer currently working and residing in Melbourne.

Elvis Richardson is an artist, writer and academic currently residing in Melbourne, who works in a variety of media including photography, sculpture and video. Richardson was awarded a BFA from the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales in 1992 and in 1996 obtained a Master of Arts, before gaining a MFA from Columbia University, New York in 2002. www.elvisrichardson.com

Victoria Lynn is a curator, writer and essayist. Since 2012 she has been the Director of TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria, and has organised and curated a large number of large scale projects and exhibitions, both national and internationally. www.victorialynn.com.au

 

All guest involvement supported by the University of Melbourne.

 

 
  22 Howey Place, Capitol Arcade (Basement Level) Melbourne CBD, 3000. Fort Delta is located in the basement of the Capitol Arcade. The best way to access Fort Delta is via Howey Place, which is a lane way that comes off Little Collins Street in Melbourne City. Walking down Howey Place, you'll find the rear entrance to the Capitol Arcade. There you'll see a set of stairs that leads down to the basement level where Fort Delta is located.

 

22 Howey Place, Capitol Arcade (Basement Level) Melbourne CBD, 3000.

Fort Delta is located in the basement of the Capitol Arcade. The best way to access Fort Delta is via Howey Place, which is a lane way that comes off Little Collins Street in Melbourne City. Walking down Howey Place, you'll find the rear entrance to the Capitol Arcade. There you'll see a set of stairs that leads down to the basement level where Fort Delta is located.